THE LONG ISLAND INSTITUTE OF SEX THERAPY
(516) 690-6779

Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy (LIIST)

Author: Rosara Torrisi

LIIST & Pelvic Physical Therapy

By Comments Off

The Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy has officially announced their partnership with New Dimensions Physical Therapy in Manhasset. Beginning in October, LIIST’s Rachel Hoffman will be providing cutting edge therapy for individuals and couples with sexuality related concerns in collaboration with Dr. Abbate.  LIIST has always collaborated with state of the art professionals on Long Island, including Dr. Abbate’s team in Manhasset. As many sex therapy clients suffer with physical pelvic floor dysfunctions and pain, this partnership provides easy to access services for couples and individual psychotherapy alongside pelvic physical therapy.

Difficulties with pain after pregnancy? This new partnership is for you!

Experiencing IBS or IC symptoms that prevent you from having sex with your partner? This new partnership is for you!

Extremely painful periods? This new partnership is for you!

Erectile dysfunction or Premature ejaculation difficulties? This new partnership is for you!

Peeing during workouts? This new partnership is for you!

Rosara Torrisi quoted in Village Voice

By Comments Off

Rosara Torrisi, founder of LIIST, quoted in today’s Village Voice article about college students utilizing sex work as a means to pay for college tuition.

>>According to Rosara Torrisi, a sex therapist at the Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy and Ph.D. candidate in Widener University’s Human Sexuality Program who counsels a number of sex workers, it is not unusual for them to encounter difficulties with romantic partners. She says her clients often struggle to distinguish their work–sex life from their love–sex life and encounter resistance from partners who have a hard time understanding what they do. “There’s a certain amount of jealousy and concern about honesty,” she said. Sex workers often experience anxiety and occasionally depression, exhaustion, and even PTSD if they’ve been in a violent situation, Torrisi said. “It’s a very isolating profession. There are very few people you can openly talk to about this.”<<

Why a sex therapist?

By Comments Off

Wondering if you should go to sex therapy?

Sex Therapy is a sub-specialty of psychotherapy, focusing on the specific concerns related to human sexuality. People of all ages, creeds, health status, ethnic backgrounds, whether partnered or single, may benefit from working with a psychotherapist who specializes in this area. Certified Sex Therapists use specialized clinical skills and theoretical knowledge to help people solve their sexual concerns.

Unlike general therapists, a sex therapist is specifically trained to work with issues including:
• Affairs
• Body image
• Compulsive sexual behaviors
• Dyspareunia
• Female Orgasmic Disorder
• Female Sexual Arousal Disorder
• Fetish & paraphilias
• Gender identity
• Hypersexuality
• Infertility
• LGBQ Issues
• Male Erectile Disorder
• Male Orgasmic Disorder
• Paraphilias
• Polyamory issues
• Premature Ejaculation
• Rape/Incest
• Sexual Aversion
• Sexuality & chronic illness
• Sexual Desire
• Sexual Enrichment
• Sexual Pain
• Sexual Trauma
• Sexuality & physical ability
• Sexuality & spirituality
• Transgender/Transsexual issues
• Vaginismus
• Vestibulitis/VVS

A Sex Therapist will meet with the person or couple in an office where an extensive history of the concerns will be taken. A Sex Therapist will note both the psychological and the physical components. After this, a treatment plan will be proposed with your involvement in its development. In some instances, a Sex Therapist may work closely with another physician or therapist to establish causes and remedies for the problems.

A Sex Therapist will educate the person or couple about the issue and options for change. This educational process may occur through suggested reading material, watching educational audio-visual materials, discussion with the therapist, and attending workshops.

A Sex Therapist may suggest a regular schedule of office appointments. Often, homework exercises to be practiced in the privacy of one’s home between office appointments will be suggested. The homework may be as general as communication exercises or as specific as actual sexual experiences.

In no instances will a Sex Therapist engage in any kind of sexual activity with a client in any location. To do so is a breach of ethics, and in some states is a crime.

Read more about what sex therapy at LIIST looks like and an interview about sex therapy with Rosara Torrisi by Judith Meer.

Super Support for Lesbian Breast Cancer Survey

By Comments Off

TORRISI- IRB Application Update- flyer number 2-page-001You may have seen this flyer floating around. And if you have, go take the survey! Seriously. Stop reading. Click this. And take the survey!

Now that you’ve taken the survey, I would like to thank the following people and organizations that have supported the advertising of this study.

First and foremost: HankyPanky.com has graciously provided each and every participant who completes the study with a $20 Coupon Voucher! (see why you should go take the survey?)

Continue reading

Shame and Guilt

By Comments Off

I was recently forwarded an article about guilt and its connection to mood disorders.

What this article seems to miss is the more important issue of shame. Guilt and shame are somewhat different but what’s important about shame is that it moves from the act to the person. Shame becomes internalized as a reflection of one’s whole self.

Excessive shame or shame in key areas of identity (such as sexuality or bodily functions) degrades one’s concept of self. This degradation is a perfect incubator for both mood disorders and personality disorders. If someone lacks a strong sense of self, they don’t believe in their ability to succeed– whether in the boardroom or the bedroom.

A degradation of a sexual sense of self through internalized shame is something many experience, especially women and LGBT individuals. This internalized sexual and bodily shame is at the core of many sexual difficulties. Sexuality disorders such as difficulties reaching orgasm and even sexual pain disorders are common results of internalized shame.

Along with mood disorders and sexuality related disorders, researchers have also found links between internalized shame and physical health. Racism has has been found to lead to poor cardiac health. Internalized homophobia can result in higher rates of cancer.

What we experience as “just” psychological can have cascading emotional and physical affects.