Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy (LIIST)

Author: Rosara Torrisi

Why a sex therapist?

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Wondering if you should go to sex therapy?

Sex Therapy is a sub-specialty of psychotherapy, focusing on the specific concerns related to human sexuality. People of all ages, creeds, health status, ethnic backgrounds, whether partnered or single, may benefit from working with a psychotherapist who specializes in this area. Certified Sex Therapists use specialized clinical skills and theoretical knowledge to help people solve their sexual concerns.

Unlike general therapists, a sex therapist is specifically trained to work with issues including:
• Affairs
• Body image
• Compulsive sexual behaviors
• Dyspareunia
• Female Orgasmic Disorder
• Female Sexual Arousal Disorder
• Fetish & paraphilias
• Gender identity
• Hypersexuality
• Infertility
• LGBQ Issues
• Male Erectile Disorder
• Male Orgasmic Disorder
• Paraphilias
• Polyamory issues
• Premature Ejaculation
• Rape/Incest
• Sexual Aversion
• Sexuality & chronic illness
• Sexual Desire
• Sexual Enrichment
• Sexual Pain
• Sexual Trauma
• Sexuality & physical ability
• Sexuality & spirituality
• Transgender/Transsexual issues
• Vaginismus
• Vestibulitis/VVS

A Sex Therapist will meet with the person or couple in an office where an extensive history of the concerns will be taken. A Sex Therapist will note both the psychological and the physical components. After this, a treatment plan will be proposed with your involvement in its development. In some instances, a Sex Therapist may work closely with another physician or therapist to establish causes and remedies for the problems.

A Sex Therapist will educate the person or couple about the issue and options for change. This educational process may occur through suggested reading material, watching educational audio-visual materials, discussion with the therapist, and attending workshops.

A Sex Therapist may suggest a regular schedule of office appointments. Often, homework exercises to be practiced in the privacy of one’s home between office appointments will be suggested. The homework may be as general as communication exercises or as specific as actual sexual experiences.

In no instances will a Sex Therapist engage in any kind of sexual activity with a client in any location. To do so is a breach of ethics, and in some states is a crime.

Read more about what sex therapy at LIIST looks like and an interview about sex therapy with Rosara Torrisi by Judith Meer.

Super Support for Lesbian Breast Cancer Survey

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TORRISI- IRB Application Update- flyer number 2-page-001You may have seen this flyer floating around. And if you have, go take the survey! Seriously. Stop reading. Click this. And take the survey!

Now that you’ve taken the survey, I would like to thank the following people and organizations that have supported the advertising of this study.

First and foremost: HankyPanky.com has graciously provided each and every participant who completes the study with a $20 Coupon Voucher! (see why you should go take the survey?)

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Shame and Guilt

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I was recently forwarded an article about guilt and its connection to mood disorders.

What this article seems to miss is the more important issue of shame. Guilt and shame are somewhat different but what’s important about shame is that it moves from the act to the person. Shame becomes internalized as a reflection of one’s whole self.

Excessive shame or shame in key areas of identity (such as sexuality or bodily functions) degrades one’s concept of self. This degradation is a perfect incubator for both mood disorders and personality disorders. If someone lacks a strong sense of self, they don’t believe in their ability to succeed– whether in the boardroom or the bedroom.

A degradation of a sexual sense of self through internalized shame is something many experience, especially women and LGBT individuals. This internalized sexual and bodily shame is at the core of many sexual difficulties. Sexuality disorders such as difficulties reaching orgasm and even sexual pain disorders are common results of internalized shame.

Along with mood disorders and sexuality related disorders, researchers have also found links between internalized shame and physical health. Racism has has been found to lead to poor cardiac health. Internalized homophobia can result in higher rates of cancer.

What we experience as “just” psychological can have cascading emotional and physical affects.

LIIST on Out of the Box radio show

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If you missed it, or want to hear it again, You can listen here to Rosara Torrisi talk about out of control sexual behaviors. On October 23rd, Rosara Torrisi was invited as a guest on LI News Radio with host David Levenstein and author/advocate Frank Vetro. Curious about sex addiction or out of control sexual behavior? Call us at 516-690-6779 or email us at RosaraTorrisi@lisextherapy.com. In collaboration with with Peter Kanaris in Smithtown, we have weekly therapy groups for both the identified client and a separate group for their spouses or significant others.

Babeland @ LIIST

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If you’ve been working with any of the therapists at the Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy, you know we love Babeland. LIIST has now developed a relationship with Babeland, so you can find all of their best products simply by clicking right ::here::!

Along with their website, Babeland also has three stores in New York that we highly recommend you pay a visit to.

 

What is Sex Therapy?

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It is understandable that you’d be concerned with what “sex therapy” might entail. We are often asked what a client might expect from sex therapy at LIIST.

Sex therapy is talk therapy with behavioral components. What that means is, in the office, we talk. The therapist never engages in physical contact with you. At first we talk about the history of who you are as a person, your family history, your dating/relationship history, your sexual history, and then the history of this problem in particular. With talk therapy, we work through any of the underlying psychological causes of your sexual difficulties. With behavioral therapy, we give you guided activities to do at home either with or without a partner. These activities start out very “low impact” and gradually work their way up to your goal. Each step is met with success before moving on to the next one. Especially throughout this process, your feedback is essential in order for us to customize your treatment to you.

Because collaboration is important, we often combine therapy at LIIST with the many allied individual and couples therapists, gynecologists, urologists, pelvic physical therapists and fertility specialists. You can contact our top Additional Resources here (go to the middle of the page).

Most people start off with weekly appointments for about 2-3 months and then move to every other week appointments for another 2-3 months, then either end therapy or move to monthly maintenance sessions for a few months, with the possibility of progressing to maintenance sessions every 3 months, or annual check ins if desired.

I hope that helps answer some of the questions you might have. Still wondering why you should go to a sex therapist?

LIIST on the Radio talking about Sex Addiction

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Did you listen to Rosara Torrisi on LI News Radio this evening with host David Levenstein and author/advocate Frank Vetro? Curious about sex addiction or out of control sexual behavior? Call us at 516-690-6779 or email us at RosaraTorrisi@lisextherapy.com. In collaboration with with Peter Kanaris in Smithtown, we have weekly therapy groups for both the identified client and a separate group for their spouses or significant others.