THE LONG ISLAND INSTITUTE OF SEX THERAPY
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Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy (LIIST)

sexuality

Rachel’s New Book

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Read Rachel Hoffman’s New Book!


Dating and Mating in a Techno Driven World


Dating and Mating in a Techno Driven World is authored by a sex therapist who regularly works with clients who are attempting to navigate the dating world or improve their relationships, this book explains how technology plays a role in creating conflict or additional anxiety and discloses techniques to help individuals gain confidence or strengthen their personal relationships.

• Suggests numerous treatment methods to help those presenting with issues related to technology

• Validates many of the breadth of emotions that accompany the experience of casual dating

• Offers clear and insightful information that will enable readers to understand why certain patterns happen to them during dating

• Presents tools and advice on how to better navigate the complicated dating world

• Provides insight into sex and tech products that can be helpful in long-distance relationships

How Close To Your Due Date Can You Have Sex?

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leandro-cesar-santana-188372Kelly Mullen-McWilliams of Romper.com spoke with Dr. Torrisi about having sex in the third trimester. Read here for some advice.

Want to know more about sexuality throughout pregnancy? Check out this article written by Dr. Torrisi for DelCoNews, this one about sex while trying to conceive,  and these tips for post-partum sex.

Whether before, during, or after pregnancy, a check-up with a pelvic physical therapist is essential and often not discussed. The majority of OBGYNs know little about pelvic floor dysfunctions so be informed and self-advocate for full post-partum care! You can find a pelvic physical therapist near you by searching here.

LIIST & Pelvic Physical Therapy

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The Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy has officially announced their partnership with New Dimensions Physical Therapy in Manhasset. Beginning in October, LIIST’s Rachel Hoffman will be providing cutting edge therapy for individuals and couples with sexuality related concerns in collaboration with Dr. Abbate.  LIIST has always collaborated with state of the art professionals on Long Island, including Dr. Abbate’s team in Manhasset. As many sex therapy clients suffer with physical pelvic floor dysfunctions and pain, this partnership provides easy to access services for couples and individual psychotherapy alongside pelvic physical therapy.

Difficulties with pain after pregnancy? This new partnership is for you!

Experiencing IBS or IC symptoms that prevent you from having sex with your partner? This new partnership is for you!

Extremely painful periods? This new partnership is for you!

Erectile dysfunction or Premature ejaculation difficulties? This new partnership is for you!

Peeing during workouts? This new partnership is for you!

Rosara Torrisi quoted in Village Voice

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Rosara Torrisi, founder of LIIST, quoted in today’s Village Voice article about college students utilizing sex work as a means to pay for college tuition.

>>According to Rosara Torrisi, a sex therapist at the Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy and Ph.D. candidate in Widener University’s Human Sexuality Program who counsels a number of sex workers, it is not unusual for them to encounter difficulties with romantic partners. She says her clients often struggle to distinguish their work–sex life from their love–sex life and encounter resistance from partners who have a hard time understanding what they do. “There’s a certain amount of jealousy and concern about honesty,” she said. Sex workers often experience anxiety and occasionally depression, exhaustion, and even PTSD if they’ve been in a violent situation, Torrisi said. “It’s a very isolating profession. There are very few people you can openly talk to about this.”<<

Shame and Guilt

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I was recently forwarded an article about guilt and its connection to mood disorders.

What this article seems to miss is the more important issue of shame. Guilt and shame are somewhat different but what’s important about shame is that it moves from the act to the person. Shame becomes internalized as a reflection of one’s whole self.

Excessive shame or shame in key areas of identity (such as sexuality or bodily functions) degrades one’s concept of self. This degradation is a perfect incubator for both mood disorders and personality disorders. If someone lacks a strong sense of self, they don’t believe in their ability to succeed– whether in the boardroom or the bedroom.

A degradation of a sexual sense of self through internalized shame is something many experience, especially women and LGBT individuals. This internalized sexual and bodily shame is at the core of many sexual difficulties. Sexuality disorders such as difficulties reaching orgasm and even sexual pain disorders are common results of internalized shame.

Along with mood disorders and sexuality related disorders, researchers have also found links between internalized shame and physical health. Racism has has been found to lead to poor cardiac health. Internalized homophobia can result in higher rates of cancer.

What we experience as “just” psychological can have cascading emotional and physical affects.