THE LONG ISLAND INSTITUTE OF SEX THERAPY
(516) 690-6779

Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy (LIIST)

squirting

Babeland @ LIIST

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If you’ve been working with any of the therapists at the Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy, you know we love Babeland. LIIST has now developed a relationship with Babeland, so you can find all of their best products simply by clicking right ::here::!

Along with their website, Babeland also has three stores in New York that we highly recommend you pay a visit to.

 

About Rachel Hoffman, LMSW

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Rachel Hoffman is a licensed social worker who has considerable experience working with teens and young adults. With an eclectic therapy style, Rachel has treated people with symptoms of depression and anxiety, especially those going through life-transitions such as break-ups, divorce or the death of a loved one.

Rachel is also a contributing writer for Elite Daily, focusing on the influence of technology on dating. Rachel ran an initiative for single parents living in the Queens area and run support groups for single parents and their children. Additionally, Rachel assists patients as a social worker on both the Oncology and Obstetrics units at the NYU Langone Medical Center.

Rachel is a member of both AASECT and NASW and is currently in graduate school earning her PhD in Human Sexuality.

Q & A re: Squirting

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Question:
A few weeks ago a friend told me that she is very embarrassed that she squirts when her boyfriend goes down on her. Is there a way she can stop squirting?

Rosara’s Answer:
I would suggest that moreso than looking to stop something her body is doing naturally she consider exploring her feelings about ejaculating during oral sex. If it’s something that is causing her considerable distress, even after exploring and resolving the influence of social pressures/norms, then she can likely learn through sex therapy ways in which to prevent her ejaculations during oral sex. I rarely counsel clients to close off sexual experiences unless they cause unwanted harm to themselves or others. I believe what may be most helpful for this young woman would be to work closely with a therapist on discussing her thoughts and feelings surrounding these experiences, her own reactions, the reactions of her partners, etc. and then coming to her own informed conclusions about whether she would like to stop experiencing her body’s natural reaction to receiving pleasure from oral sex. In the meantime, if she’d like to stop ejaculating and only does so during oral sex, for the time being, she might consider not engaging in oral sex with a partner.